IT’S GOOD TO BE BACK IN PRINT!

After four online-only issues of BVM, we are so pleased to be also producing a printed version again. The newsletter will continue to be available online, as before, via the village website. We are always very happy to receive news and recipes for inclusion.

NORTH WEST RELIEF ROAD: EMERGENCY STOP!

Last month Northamptonshire County Council’s development control committee met to decide the North West Relief Road (NWRR) planning application. Boughton Parish Council representatives, including legal counsel and a transport expert, were set to speak but the meeting was deferred after papers from Northamptonshire Highways (the applicant) were submitted only late the night before. The councillor who proposed the deferment also cited concerns raised in the Parish Council’s response, including the consultation and the traffic modelling, and expressed a desire that the traffic model should be rerun. It is unknown whether this has happened and, as yet, there is no date for the application to be decided.

PARISH CHARITY HAS FUNDS TO HELP STUDENTS IN NEED

The Richard Humfrey (Education) Foundation provides financial assistance to students under 25 undertaking further education studies. Applicants should normally be resident in the Parish of Boughton and apply by the end of October. Awards are made in cases of financial or personal hardship. Applications should be made in writing to the secretary Jill Gist. The charity is also appealing for volunteers to act as trustees. This is not a significant commitment as there are just two brief meetings a year. For more information about the grant application process or on becoming a trustee, contact Jill on 847890 or email jandrgist@tiscali.co.uk

POCKET PARK LAUNCHES FUNDRAISING PAGE

“We are reaching out to everyone in the local area in these desperate times,” writes Karen Fletcher, chair of Boughton Pocket Park Committee. “We rely entirely on fundraising to cover our annual fixed costs, some £6,000 for mowing, equipment repairs etc. Our main income stream comes from the annual bonfire, which we cannot hold this year, and so we are facing a financial crisis. We have set up a Crowdfunder page and are hoping everyone can spare £5 or £10 to keep the park open, pleasant and safe. We are a registered charity. Save Boughton Pocket Park’s page will go live on the site later this month.”

NOTTINGHAM KNOCKERS IN THE VILLAGE

Some residents may well have been visited last month by so-called “Nottingham Knockers”. A reminder to never buy anything off the doorstep. No legitimate charity would endorse door-to-door selling. Please report such people to the Police on 101.

BUCKTON FIELDS SCHOOL – PLANNING APPLICATION SUBMITTED

After years of delay, a planning application for a primary school at Buckton Fields was submitted to Daventry District Council (DDC) earlier in the summer – after the deadline for the July BVM. The application can be viewed on DDC’s planning portal using reference number DA/2020/0465. Boughton Parish Council submitted a response after seeking specialist planning advice.

RE-OPENING OF THE VILLAGE SCHOOL

The Primary School is fully reopening this month with staggered start and finish times to manage distancing. This will affect traffic and parking outside the school over a longer period than normal.

COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS STILL ON HAND TO HELP

The group of volunteers established by BVM and the Parish Council at the beginning of lockdown is still here to help if you are shielding or self isolating and require shopping, prescriptions collecting or simply to have a chat on the phone. Please contact Charlotte Mackaness (07808 725124) or the Parish Clerk, Jayne Bunting, on 882527.

SMITH FAMILY PLEA AFTER LITTER PICK

George, Brodie and Indi Smith of Vyse Road kindly did a litter pick at the end of August of areas including Vyse Road, Spinney Close, the Spinney and the Pocket Park. “We were shocked at how many face masks were scattered about,” writes George. “We also collected over 12 cans from the park and bushes and disgusting cigarette ends and a lot of broken glass. Perhaps with the increasing numbers of visitors to the village and Pocket Park we could encourage people to take their litter home.”

FOODBANK REMINDER

Demand for foodbank services has never been greater. Please don’t forget we have a deposit box for dried and tinned goods, toiletries and cleaning products in the old phone box at the bottom of Church Street.

ROSALEEN POOLE’S CHICKEN WITH CHORIZO & SPINACH

Ingredients:

  • 1tbsp coconut oil
  • 150g chorizo, finely diced
  • 1 red onion, diced
  • 2 chicken breasts, cut into 1cm slices
  • 8 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 6 fistfuls baby spinach leaves
  • 2 balls mozzarella torn into chunks
  • 40g pine nuts

Method:

Heat the coconut oil in a large frying pan over a medium to high heat. Add the chorizo and fry for one minute. Add the onion and fry for another minute. Increase the heat to maximum and add the chicken, along with a pinch of salt and pepper. Stir fry for about three minutes by which time the chicken should be almost cooked through. Throw in the cherry tomatoes and cook for a minute or until they begin to collapse. Toss in the spinach and stir through until fully wilted. Use a wooden spoon to make little pockets in the mixture and drop in small chunks of the mozzarella. Turn off the heat and allow the cheese to melt before serving. Scatter with pine nuts.

Boughton Between The Wars

Village Highways

These were years before the village streets were named and name plates appeared. Butchers Lane and Moulton Lane were known as now but the villagers knew the other roads as follows: “The Square” – junction of Church Street, Humfrey Lane and Moulton Lane. “Down Street” – Square to the Bakehouse, now Church Street. “Up Street” – Square to Sawpit, now part of Humfrey Lane. “Round The Top” – Sawpit to Ellen Cattell’s Corner, now the remainder of Humfrey Lane. “New Road” – Ellen Cattell’s Corner to Bakehouse, now part of Vyse Road.

The description of one location within the Parish has perhaps happily been lost in time, for during the twenties and thirties the hill on the main road just South of the Boughton turn was widely known as “Gallows Hill”. This suggests that in earlier times it had been the site of public executions. Perhaps it is not difficult to imagine – a moonless night – the lonely hilltop on the rutted “cole track”, the nearest habitation a mile away – a mournful wind swinging the remnant of a rope attached to the gibbet.

In the twenties the main Northampton-Market Harborough road was frequently referred to as the “Turnpike” – a name recalling the pre-1872 days of tollgates. I recall being told as a boy that the nearest tollgates to Boughton had been at Kingsthorpe just South of the Cock Hotel and between Pitsford and Brixworth, where the tollhouse still stands adjacent to the bridge over the brook, below the reservoir embankment.

Until about 1930 the district roads through the village and parish were constructed of waterbound granite. Chipped granite pieces approximately one and half inches to two inches in size were rolled into mud slurry by gangs of men working with a horse-drawn cart and a trundling steam roller. After winter frosts, the carriageway, lacking the binding qualities of tarmacadam, would break up and form potholes until repaired by the Council repair gang. The loose pieces of granite were ready-use missiles for boys, and stone throwing was frequently the reason for a finger wagging telling off by the village policeman. As the roads dried out on warm spring and summer days the few motor vehicles passing through the village would cause clouds of yellow dust to rise and settle on grass verges, doorsteps and windowsills.

Harry Lovell

VILLAGE HALL UPDATE

Currently, the Village Hall is not taking bookings. However, the Hall committee is meeting later this month to discuss the current guidelines and how things will proceed going forward and will update the local community soon.